Police Finding Assistance For Everett Addicts in California

February 8, 2016

Everett, Everett Government

Everett addicts

More help on the way for addicts in Everett, WA

An update as we cover progress of the Safe Streets Plan in Everett. The Everett Police Department is working to find ways to help addicts and break the cycle of arrest, release, arrest, release, etc. Last week Lauren Rainbow, a social worker embedded with the Everett Police Department updated two success stories using a new network of police and private groups.

Last November I shared the story of Amy*, a young woman who was homeless and struggling with addiction. We worked hard to gain her access to long-term treatment through the Police Assisted Addiction Recovery Initiative (PAARI) network and I am happy to report that she continues to strive towards recovery and healthy life choices.

Amy was accepted on a full scholarship to the Bella Monte Recovery Center in Desert Hot Springs, CA for 90 days of intensive inpatient treatment. Amy has nearly completed her treatment and has made many strides in regaining the direction of her life. Looking ahead, she has decided that staying in California where she has a strong recovery network will be the best choice for her and her family. Amy has received a scholarship for 90 days of intensive outpatient treatment with Pacific Palms in Dana Point, CA to continue her work. She will be living at the Pacific Palms Recovery sober living environment, also on scholarship, where she looks forward to living with other people who are committed to their sobriety.

Amy and I talk weekly. She is full of life and has hope for her future. Amy has worked hard to rebuild her relationship with her mother and reports that she feels choosing this path now will set her up to be a good mother to her own son. All of us at the Everett Police Department are immensely proud of Amy’s progress and we look forward to maintaining a connection with her as she moves forward.

We have also helped another resident of Everett, Ben*, gain access to treatment for his heroin addiction at Bella Monte. This young man reached out to the department for help and we were able to secure him a treatment bed and detox by the end of that same day. Ben has private health insurance, but needed help in navigating the treatment system, and we were able to help him and his family move through that process quickly. I have kept close contact with Ben as he nears the end of his first month of treatment and am happy to report that he is doing very well.

The Bella Monte Recovery Center partnered with PAARI in June 2015 after learning about the alternative efforts some law enforcement agencies have taken to address drug addiction. Clinical Director Joseph Dubois explains that as a treatment provider they recognize that addiction is an epidemic that needs to be addressed, and Bella Monte wanted to support this innovative effort. Dubois reflects that it has been an honor to be a part of people’s journey through recovery and that he and his staff appreciate being involved in an initiative that is able to help individuals with no resources access quality treatment.

To date, Bella Monte has accepted six PAARI referrals, two of which have come from the Everett Police Department, and they look forward to welcoming others. The program model offers evidence-based therapies that are incorporated into their 12-step foundation, along with a family program, equine therapy, and personalized treatment planning provided by kind, compassionate, and professional staff.

The opportunity to get Amy and Ben into treatment arose from the growing relationship between the Everett Police Department, the PAARI program, local detox facilities, and numerous treatment centers around the country who are dedicated to working with law enforcement agencies to offer help to people struggling with addictions. The Everett Police Department has been very encouraged by the impact this program has already made in our community and we are now laying the foundation to fully launch PAARI in the upcoming months.

Providence Regional Medical Center and Pioneer Human Services have both committed to partnering with Everett Police to provide medical detoxes for those who may require detox before going to treatment, and we are continuing to reach out to other potential providers before we officially present this program to our community. We feel confident that bringing this program to the Everett Police Department will give our community another resource to help address serious addiction issues.

*Names have been changed to maintain confidentiality.

Learn more about the social worker program. Please note that the intent of the embedded social worker program is not to circumvent established social service programs, but to assist officers in providing assistance to frequent utilizers and the chronically homeless beyond the traditional role of law enforcement. If you, or someone you know, are in need of services, please contact 2-1-1 for assistance or visit their website. 2-1-1 is an easy-to-remember phone number that quickly connects people with resources in their community.




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About myeverettnews

My Everett News is a hyperlocal news website featuring breaking news and events in Everett, WA. We also cover City of Everett information and items of interest to those who live and work in Everett. It's written by Leland Dart a former Snohomish County based radio reporter born and raised in Everett.

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13 Responses to “Police Finding Assistance For Everett Addicts in California”

  1. Ruckus Says:

    It’s obviously a complicated issue; however, enabling is not the answer in any terms. And I’m really tired of paying all these people to do drugs.

  2. Eleanore Says:

    well I don’t think enabling them is helping them, giving them everything for free not having to work is not the answer either

  3. Eleanore Says:

    Yes send all of Everett’s crackheads and tweekers to Cali NOW thanks, signed the responsible citizens

    • Mack Says:

      Oh, I get it, pawn our problems off on another state, rather than take steps to address the problems we face as a society.

      Yes, responsible indeed.

      • hello Says:

        How about you go feed and shelter them? And then let them rip you off? And keep enabling their habit?

        Oh wait, the city of Everett and Washington State do that already.

  4. Bourne Says:

    The problem with socialism is you eventually run out of other peoples money.

  5. Mack Says:

    I’m just here to voice my support for these programs, and these people who need help.

    People, not trash.

    • hello Says:

      Until they quit stealing crap in my neighborhood and acting like trash, then they will be considered trash.

    • Rickshaw Says:

      As long as they keep committing crimes to get high, they are trash. I’m sorry they stuck a needle in their arm sometime in their past and liked it, which is exactly what happened. People act like all these people were “born” with a drug problem – like they were all crack babies. I’m sorry you felt the need to huff paint as a teenager and move on to bigger and better drugs as an adult. Don’t ask me to feel bad for you because you’re succumbing to your own bad decisions.

  6. Bourne Says:

    Who is responsible for reporting recidivism?

  7. hello Says:

    Go to California and don’t come back! Good riddance to bad trash!